Starting Point: A Short Q&A About A Short Film’s Journey to Festival

Oh, what a difference a year can make! It hasn’t yet been a full 365 days since filmmaker Sirada Tritruengtassana first walked onto the campus of Sarah Lawrence College to attend the International Film Institute of New York’s summer filmmaking course. In the months since “graduating” from the five-week intensive film program, Sirada has hit the ground running with her short film that was created in the summer of 2017, entering it into several international festivals.

In the Q&A below, #IFI caught up with Sirada the weekend of her film’s debut at the International New York Film Festival in Manhattan (and, she won Silver!!!).

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  1. Why are you a filmmaker?  I love telling a story. For me, making a film is like projecting my dream into moving pictures.
  2. Can you describe your film in three sentences?  I think three sentences will reveal everything in my five-minute short film. So, I  will give you three words : a girl, invisible, and murder.
  3. What was the best thing about making your film?  The best thing is my team. They are so awesome. I became friends with them in such a short time because we had gone so much together during the shoot. Without them, I don’t think I could have made this film happen.
  4. What was the worst thing about making your film?  Well, every shoot has its own struggle. My struggle was my first actress walked away from my set before we even began shooting. It was hard for me, but it also made me learn how to adapt with the situation and keep going — even without the lead actress. I think I have become a good problem solver after that [experience].
  5. Why did you decide to enter your film in INYFF? Are you planning to enter it into any other festivals?  Actually, I have entered my film, Invisible Murder, into a lot of festivals and INYFF is one of them. I chose this festival because it supports minorities in the film industry – both female and international filmmakers.
  6. What are the next plans for you and your film?  I’m still waiting for some festivals to reply for this film, and my new film that I just made this year. I’m also planning on making a new film this July. It’s going to be different from my current films and relating more about my tradition and culture.
  7. Who is your filmmaking inspiration?  don’t think I have anyone in particular. Anyone or anything can inspire me to make film.

If you’re considering a career in film or pursuing an interest within the industry, IFI has several summer courses to suit your needs. Visit www.nyfilmschool.com to learn more about the Five-Week Summer Filmmaking Collective, One-Week Introduction to Filmmaking and those with very little free time, the Two-Day Introduction to Filmmaking.

BECOMING A PRODUCER TAKES CREATIVITY + GRIT

A brief chat with producer Stephanie Serra

On Saturday, January 13, The International Film Institute of New York will welcome back Stephanie Serra of  Triserratops Productions to its Manhattan classroom for a one-day Introduction to Producing Seminar. According to Stephanie, becoming a successful producer takes a lot of creative thinking and some elbow grease, plus a few other considerations you can read about below or learn in person if you sign up for her course at www.nyfilmschool.com.

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What is one thing you learned as a producer after working on your first project?

My first project took place in a New Jersey junkyard, filled with rusty old cars. I had 10 filmmakers on my crew and three actors (two of whom were children). We had little-to-no money and two days to shoot a script that included gunshots, rabbits, choreographed violence, a burial, and a runaway sequence.

When you’re making movies early on and have little-no experience, things will inevitably go wrong or not according to plan. When this happens, I’ve learned that the most important thing a producer can do is to make decisions with your collaborators’ best interests in mind. A cast and crew that is taken care of and that feels appreciated at every turn will help carry a production through its most difficult challenges.

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[Stephanie on location with her actors]

What is your favorite part of producing a film or TV show?

When I was producing in college, I recognized, early on, the value of pre-production.

Since my crews and I were mostly working with ultra-low(-no) budgets, it was critical that we spend time conceptualizing and planning for the execution of each of our shooting days – and to do so with the resources we had available to us, in mind.

For the plans that included the use of resources we didn’t have at our disposal, pre-production was where I learned to think creatively about my negotiations and where I began to take risks as a producer in reaching for the things I needed for my crew and production.

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Project in production

Are there magazines, websites or social media pages that you subscribe to or follow for industry news and info?

I usually turn to the industry trades: Hollywood Reporter, Variety, Deadline, Independent Filmmaker Project (IFP), IMDB. Box Office Mojo will give you a sense of how films are doing in the box office and Nielsen reports are a valuable source for industry related research and data.

If you could only give our IFI audience one piece of advice on being a producer, what would you offer?

Don’t let a lack of money (or the very rare surplus of it) be an excuse for not telling a decent story. If you can’t get financed when you’re starting out, take a creative look at the resources you do have at your disposal and, make your movie anyway. (Also learn a craft within the industry… even though, that’s a second piece of advice.)

 


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com

9 Things Filmmakers Wish You Knew About Life On Set

Nothing will prepare you for taking your first step onto a film set, but the International Film Institute of New York (IFI) can provide you with helpful tips on what to expect. We asked three IFI instructors what three things they teach their students in the classroom. Here is what they told us so you can be ready for your film set debut.

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Kyle Wilamowski, IFI directing instructor, writer and director, shared his thoughts:

  • Communication is everything. While everyone has a role, if communication isn’t properly happening, nothing will work. And, everything will fall apart. Film school is about learning a lot of things, but learning how to communicate your vision or your role is #1.
  • It’s grueling. It’s easy to think that films are the most fun thing in the world. However, being on set can be incredibly physically and emotionally taxing in ways you’d never expect. If it wasn’t, everyone would do it. Emotional and physical stamina working in tandem is key.
  • All the keys positions (producers, director, DP) are a pyramid scheme. The attitude you reflect to your crew spreads like wildfire. If you’re in a bad mood or worried, your crew will know it. That doesn’t mean you have to be happy and positive at all times, more that you need to know how your attitude impacts the crew members around you and therefore the work.

Jesus Alarcon, IFI directing instructor, writer, director and cinematographer, added:

  • Preparation doesn’t kill improvisation, it makes room for it. The more prepared you are, the better you know what you’re trying to achieve with the scene and with your shots, the more prepared you will be to take advantage for the inevitable and unexpected set backs that comes with filmmaking.
  • Be punctual. Being on time shows respect and commitment to the project and to your fellow filmmakers and their talent. “Time is only dead if you kill it.”
  • Life on the set is a collaborative effort. No matter how talented you are you still need to rely on your crew in order to achieve your film. You constantly battle against what is, while trying to achieve what it should be. The more nimble you’re in turning a compromise into an asset, the better you become at your craft.

Frederic Richter, IFI screenwriting instructor, writer and producer, offered the following advice from the writer’s perspective:

  • Filmmaking is all about collaboration – so be ready for it. Be open and willing to work with others, try and discuss new ideas and approaches. This goes for directors, too. While the set is your place, a good director knows what they want, but they also surround themselves with people who can offer new ideas to get them what they want. Be open to collaborating!
  • Writers need to be prepared for things to not be EXACTLY as written on the page. Again, they need to be collaborative. Do not start directing — leave that to the director. If you are asked your opinion, give it, but be discreet.
  • Safety, safety, safety. Film sets can be fun magical places, but you also ALWAYS need to keep safety in mind first, especially if working anywhere near electrical, lighting or other equipment. On a moment’s notice a film set can turn from something amazing to a dangerous place. Keep safety in mind always.

At the end of the day, enjoy the experience. “You need to have fun and work hard. Both are key to making a good movie,” said Wilamowski.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com

Beyond IFI: A conversation with filmmaker Courtney Harmstone

Repost from Sarah Lawrence College Summer Programs Post.

The confidence I gained at IFI has propelled me throughout my career.  The passion and the buzz I first felt in that casting room in Columbia University has not left me. Whenever I doubt myself, I think back to that day and that memory gives me the energy to continue.”  ~ Courtney Harmstone, International Film Institute, ’08

 

chCourtney Harmstonea self-described American-British hybrid” took one her first steps in film during the International Film Institute’s Summer Intensive at Sarah Lawrence in 2008. Since then, she has worked in film on both sides of the Atlantic, working as a producer, mentor, and co-founder and programmer of Catfish Shorts, a networking and film festival created for women in the film industry. Courtney recently shared with us about her in the film industry, future projects, and favorite memories of her time as at Sarah Lawrence College.
How did you initially get involved in the International Film Institute summer intensive?
When I was in high school I was always passionate about film and television, but my school did not offer a course in filmmaking.  I had previously attended summer film courses at SCAD that were only one week in duration.  It was a nice taster, but I longed for more. After researching various programs, I found IFI at Sarah Lawrence College which had the depth and breadth I was looking for as well as fabulous teachers active in the industry.   I was excited to be part of this intensive and immersive environment where I could experiment with the craft and find out if this was what I wanted to do with my life.  Spoiler alert! I am still working in film!
What is your favorite memory from that experience?
A great memory from my time at IFI was casting for the short film we were required to make during the course.  It was pretty inspiring to have these young and incredibly talented actors come and read portions of our scripts to us at Columbia University.  There was a buzz in the room and the energy was overwhelming.  I couldn’t believe these young professionals were interested in working with us! It was a great experience. It was very professional.

Another is being around so many creative people who, like me, knew little about the art of filmmaking or had minimal experience. It had a synergistic effect that created a supportive environment that allowed us to experiment with new ideas and take risks.
How has it impacted your life since then?
IFI had a huge impact on my life and my future career decisions.  It was the first opportunity I had to really explore filmmaking and to learn what it meant to work in the dramatic arts; how to plan, structure, shoot and edit a short film.  The course inspired me to pursue the film industry as my future career.  When I returned from New York, I knew I wanted to be a filmmaker and set my sights on pursuing a B.F.A. in film production.  In 2013, I graduated from The Florida State University College of Motion Picture Arts and then continued my education two years later at The University of Exeter and The London Film School with an M.A. in International Film Business.   
What advice would you give to your younger self?
If I could go back to myself at that age I would probably say TAKE MORE RISKS! Don’t be scared to experiment and have the confidence to just go out with a camera and shoot.  However, it is with the understanding that I did not take enough risks in filmmaking (and possibly with life) when I was younger – playing it safe, so to speak – that drives me so much now to push myself to take every opportunity that comes my way, and not to turn it down because I’m scared of the consequences (which, so far, have been very positive).  

I’d probably also tell myself to avoid rum, but I think everyone can relate to that one!
What’s next for you going forward?
The next steps for me are to continue working hard on my independent projects – Catfish Shorts and Indigo Valley – and to look for opportunities that will strengthen my skills as a Producer as I attempt to carve my way through this complicated jungle that we call an industry.  Sometimes you just have to follow the three Ps, as laid out by Robert Wise (Director, The Sound of Music, West Side Story) – “My three Ps: passion, patience, perseverance. You have to do this if you’ve got to be a filmmaker.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com

What to Look for in a Film Program

Students Share Why They Chose IFI

Once a year, The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) gathers future filmmakers from all corners of the globe for five weeks of intensive filmmaking.

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The students who enroll range from curious newcomers to the self-taught and experienced. Every summer, they assemble on the leafy campus of Sarah Lawrence College, just outside New York City, where staff at IFI give hours of instruction and hands-on training.

There they receive the tools, skills and confidence to continue on their filmmaking journey.

So, why should you come to IFI? Our students say it best. Here’s ten reasons why, out of all the film schools and courses to choose from, this year’s crop of students say our program was the right fit for them:

WHY IFI?

“I want learn more about directing, screenwriting and also technical stuff that I haven’t gotten the chance to learn back in my country. I’ve taken a few film classes at university but I’m going to take it more seriously in the coming year. (IFI) has helped me realize I really want to focus on film.” – Sirada, 20, Thailand.

“I know I’m interested in film but I don’t know if it’s a hobby or a career … I think [IFI] is the best scenario to (figure that out) in because you’re actually doing it. It’s a pretty deep crash course.” – India, 16, Shelbyville, Ky.

“I’m self-taught so I’m here to hone my craft and learn the right way.” – Alex, 25, Dallas, Tx.

“I wanted to switch it up and come to New York, that was a big draw.” – Liam, 18, Fairfax, Va.

“I found [#IFI] and it’s close and I just thought I might as well do it now before college just to see if this is something I want to do.” – Alexa, 17, Scarsdale, Ny.

“IFI welcomes people from all over. I was interested to study filmmaking in the U.S. to see how other people write, direct and edit.” Ariana, 25, Peru

“I’m really, really, really interested in this field, and I want to be a part of it. I just really want to learn.” – Harry, 14, Stony Brook, Ny.

“[IFI had] so much of what I wanted to do: Being able to make films and being able to use the real equipment and learn the real methods and strategies and figuring out ways to express my ideas.” – Matthew, 16, Scarsdale, Ny.

“It’s fun finally learning how to do hands-on stuff [in film].’” Chelsea, 17, Bronx, Ny.

“To get to be involved in everything, to see what it’s really like and to get as real an experience as possible, that was an absolute selling point for me.” – Tom, 16, Red Hook, Ny.

IFI is currently accepting students for its 2017-2018 Winter Schedule offering one-day seminars and multi-day courses. Early registration for IFI’s 2018 Summer Filmmaking Intensive will be posted at http://www.nyfilmschool.com soon.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com

Paying It Forward

A college-bound filmmaker gives back to the program that gave shape to his filmmaking aspirations

Jonathan Schneider, an 18-year-old graduate of Scarsdale High School is headed to Drexel University to study film and video production. He credits a week-long intensive course he took at International Film Institute of New York (IFI) in the summer of 2016 with helping him to realize that his love of film wasn’t just a hobby, but the career he wanted to pursue in college. He returned to IFI earlier this summer to volunteer as a producer’s assistant, helping students on the set of their short films for the second year in a row.

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“When I took the one week course, I learned about the bones and what goes into filmmaking and what the industry is really like. I was with some gifted teachers who showed me how in-depth such an art form can be and I got really into it. I saw that that’s what I wanted to do and that was only reinforced when I was asked to help out a week after and I was on a different film set every day,” Schneider says. “Not a single day was I unhappy or tired. I loved every second of it. I knew that it was something I wanted to do.”

IFI co-founder Misael Sanchez also got Schneider and two other IFI students positions as production assistants on Three Christs, an indie film that shot on the Sarah Lawrence College campus last year, starring Richard Gere, Peter Dinklage, Juliana Margulies and Bradley Whitford, among others.

“We basically would do whatever needed to be done. I sat for an hour watching Richard Gere’s green tea to make sure nobody got it,” Schneider recalls.

His experience on a professional film set was invaluable. “I got a feel for what it meant to be in a professional environment. It scared me a bit because I saw how stressful it was and how sometimes it’s not always a happy-go-lucky job, but I just think it was amazing. It also gave me hope because I know there’s a lot to do and there’s a lot of passion,” Schneider says. “It made it very real. Maybe in a month I went from seeing it as a hobby to seeing it as something I want to do with my life. And, I can only thank Misael and IFI for that.”

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At Drexel, Jonathan plans to double major in film and environmental studies. “What I’m really interested in is becoming an environmental documentarian or photographer of some sort because I care about the environment,” he says.

Thanks to the hands-on experience that IFI has equipped him with, he feels he has a head start. Besides his time volunteering with student productions and his PA experience on Three Christs, his connections with IFI instructors have paid dividends outside of the Sarah Lawrence campus, too.

“Last year I met IFI cinematography instructor Kate Montgomery. We worked outside of IFI for a while, I also PA’ed for her, doing gigs here and there. I met a lot of the people I know in the industry now through the IFI summer film program.”

It’s only natural that he’d want to pay it forward. Schneider says he came back to help out this summer not just for the experience, networking and connections, but the fun of seeing the lightbulb go off for budding film students.

“I love the atmosphere here,” he says. “It’s very creative. You have people who have never done film before but you also have people who do it all the time and they all get something different out of the experience. And, I love to teach so I love when somebody needs help with something and I can say, ‘I got this! I can help you out,’ it feels good and it makes me feel a lot more secure with my skills.”

At the end of the day, it’s fun.

“I wouldn’t really call this a job so much as just me doing what I like to do, helping everybody else out,” Schneider says.

 


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com 

Is Film School For Me?

Back to school with IFI

As the sun sets in the sky ever earlier and a chill creeps into the air, it signals the time has come to head back to school. But, with the end of carefree summer days comes the excitement and back-to-business buzz of fall. Sharpen your pencils because International Film Institute of New York (IFI) founder Misael Sanchez is here to take you to school on the benefits of studying film. Whether you’re a teen testing the waters, a passionate filmmaker considering a graduate degree, or an adult looking to learn a new skill, Misael’s got you covered from immersive courses to film school, and how to evaluate the options:

What are the benefits of attending a film school?

Misael Sanchez: First, it is an opportunity to completely immerse yourself into something you are passionate about and be able to devote 100% of yourself to making films. Of course, if you are attending an undergraduate program that requires you to complete other degree requirements you’d still have to balance, that’s still an amazing opportunity. Second, you surround yourself with like-minded individuals working toward the same goal. Yes, it is fun gathering your friends and making them act and work behind the camera for you. But, in film school there is no arm twisting. You fuel each other’s creativity and spend several years developing relationships that will last long after graduation. This is definitely the one aspect of school that I have witnessed be the greatest benefit. And lastly, some might consider this the most important, you get to work with faculty that have been in the field for years and can provide you the support and guidance to find your voice. Equipment and facilities, to me, do not make a film school great. Yes, it is nice to work with good cameras and have lights and sound production resources, but to base your choices on what school to attend based solely on that is not something I would encourage.

Misael WorkshopWhat advice do you have for younger students (i.e., teens, undergraduates)?

MS: My advice to young people considering film as a career is to make sure this is right for you before committing time and money. Filmmaking is not cheap. Tuition alone is enough to send you to the ER. On top of that, you have the costs associated with your projects followed by years of trial and error to make it all come together. Find a way to explore what film has to offer. Consider short term programs to test the waters. It is definitely not all about the red carpet. Filmmaking is a job that takes commitment.

What advice do you have for older students (i.e., adults, graduate candidates)?

MS: There is also something very interesting about adults entering the field. There is a very strong desire to succeed and make it happen fast because you are not a recent college grad and you believe you have more experience to make it happen. My biggest advice for adults is to leave the ego at the door and take in the experience. As adults we pretty much know who we are and what we want to express about ourselves and the world we live in. Make every effort to open your mind to different interpretations of your world and allow yourself to be vulnerable. Allow for mistakes. Most of all, allow yourself to let someone else show you something new. Maybe it won’t be as groundbreaking as you might want but it will be different.

What are some other programs or courses available without the full-time commitment of film school?

MS: Aside from our immersive IFI courses that cover all aspects of the process from script to screen, there are other degree programs that could offer opportunities. Researching and making sure a program fits your needs is key to a positive experience. Online direct student reviews are a great way to read about what others have experienced. Filmschool.org is a great third-party website where students give honest reviews of their experiences. It is where we tell our students to go when we have inquiries about our classes. Also, when communicating with the programs, you should feel like you are being respected as a prospective student. There are never too many questions and the answers should flow. From my perspective, when we discuss our courses with students we see it as an interview process that goes both ways. Are we right for you and what you hope to get from school and are you right for what we provide? We never hesitate to tell a students that maybe our curriculum is not what they need right now. Or, perhaps, you need something longer term.  Best we tackle these questions before you register to make sure our time together is fruitful and a pleasant experience.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com 

Filmmaker Snapshots: Kate Montgomery

Fast Facts: Kate Montgomery


IMG_8870.JPG.jpegCinematographer, Writer

Current project: CHRISTINE

Recent work: An untitled project with the late actor Martin Landau

You might have seen her: Premiering CHRISTINE at OutFest LA or WINNING Best Short Film in the Women in Film & Television Atlanta Short Film Showcase

Based in: New York

Spends summers: In Bronxville. Kate has worked as an instructor during IFI’s Five-Week Summer Filmmaking Intensive held at Sarah Lawrence College. The program is designed to completely immerse students into the filmmaking process, from screenwriting to post-production. In 2017, Kate taught IFI’s Camera Tech course.

See below for a trailer of CHRISTINE:

With the help of her best friend, Christine redefines her perception of strength and what it means to be herself.

Written and Shot by Kate Montgomery
Directed by Jessica Adler
Produced by Stephanie Serra of Triserratops Productions

 

👋 Thanks for getting to know IFI.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com 

 

New York City vs. Los Angeles – The Filmmaker’s Conundrum

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New York City owes a lot of its glamorous, iconic status to film. From King Kong climbing the Empire State Building to Robert De Niro’s You talkin’ to me? in Taxi Driver, the greatest city on earth is great in part because filmmakers have flocked here for generations to imprint New York in all its loud, proud glory on celluloid for generations to come. After all, New York City is a movie in itself – a rom-com walk in Central Park one moment, a Woody Allen gabfest the next, and navigating the crowds near the Rockefeller Christmas tree during the holidays can quickly turn into a nightmarish thriller.

But for the second year in a row, blockbuster movies filmed in New York have declined.

Of the top 100 highest-grossing domestic feature films released in theaters last year, only six were made in the Empire State, according to a study released May 23 by nonprofit organization Film L.A., whose mission is to keep production in Los Angeles. The number, which is down from seven the previous year and from a peak of 12 in 2014, puts New York in sixth place.

Georgia had the most top-grossing motion pictures with 17, followed by the United Kingdom with 16 and Canada with 13. California hosted 12 blockbusters, which put it fourth.

So what’s behind the trend?

“New York has become a TV town,” Film L.A.’s lead researcher, Adrian McDonald, told Crain’s New York. “That’s not necessarily a bad thing. The budgets on many one-hour shows rival that of large movies.”

According to the study, the state has so much television production that overall it ranked second in total film and TV production spending with an estimated $5 billion to $6 billion after California, where an estimated $30 billion is spent on production annually.

020.JPGIndeed, the sheer variety of production in New York City is what keeps Misael Sanchez, founder and director of the International Film Institute of New York based in the city that never sleeps. He lived and worked in L.A. for a two-year stint in 2011 and ‘12 before returning to New York.

“My personal experience with the two towns is a perfect example of why new opportunities seem to be opening in New York,” Sanchez says. “New York is more than movies. It has fashion, advertising, corporations, health organizations, small businesses, theater, all looking for content. Filling that production void is what called me back east.”

So where should an aspiring filmmaker put down roots – New York or L.A.? It’s an age old question that Sanchez fields from students every year.

As a film professor I spend quite a bit of time discussing with my students the opportunities related to staying here or moving out west,” says Sanchez, who spent 15 years as a professor and director of production at Columbia’s Graduate School of Film before moving to Sarah Lawrence College to teach film production.

“Both cities offer incredible opportunities in the television, film, and theater industry. L.A. is known for being the heart of the film industry but New York has always been a city for independent filmmaking. Everything about the city’s resources lends itself to the smaller budget projects,” he says. “That, in turn, provides opportunities for up and coming filmmakers. In addition, being in a town where everything is relatively close to everything else makes networking and meeting others outside of your field much more accessible.”

The other driving factor behind production location is simply the bottom line: New York’s $420 million annual tax-incentive program is a huge attraction, but it only covers so-called “below-the-line costs” such as crew salaries and production expenses. The tax incentive in Georgia offers 30% on the entire movie budget, including star salaries, and has no annual cap.

But when you need to set a story in New York, there’s no substitute for the real thing. And New York City’s scrappy reputation means it will always be home for young, hungry artists.  

“I do feel that the best is yet to come,” Sanchez says. “More opportunities are on the horizon as film professionals continue to call New York City and the surrounding cities home base. Los Angeles will always be a huge part of what makes the film industry but New York is what will keep the torch alive and moving into the future.”


Misael Sanchez: Founder and director of instruction at The International Film Institute of New York, currently working in collaboration with Sarah Lawrence College. BFA, New York University. Certificate in Producing, The New School. Recent production credits include a feature-length documentary, Last Call (director and cinematographer), now in post-production and producer on the feature-length narrative, Central Avenue, scheduled to cast Marisa Tomei and Lorraine Bracco. A book-in-progress on cinematography lighting techniques is titled Lighting Tricks and ShortCuts. Staff member, faculty member, and head of the cinematography concentration at Columbia University’s Graduate Film Division, where he supervises students on thesis productions. Past work includes four one-hour specials on Latinos in the media for network television, short documentary projects, films, music videos, and industrials. SLC, 2009–

 

 

 

Indie Filmmaking 101: How to Make a Film in NYC

Independent film [or indie film] is a feature film that is produced outside of the major film studio system.

It’s always nice to have access to a big budget to hire crew, sign on talent, secure locations, and rent equipment. However, at International Film Institute of New York, we know that’s rarely how your story will make it to screen. Read on for indie filmmaking tips and recommendations from our team of NYC-based industry professionals.  11935115_1054259404598949_7324463551256814401_n.jpg

Making an Indie Film in NYC:

  1. Image result for Pulaski Bridge in BrooklynWe love Manhattan, but shoot outside of it. New York City’s boroughs and neighboring states have so much to offer your film. Checking out the surrounding areas will also save your budget by offering lower cost locations and interesting backdrops.
  2. Your equipment matters. Rental houses offer free demonstrations and training on new film equipment open to the filmmaker community. Take advantage of these resources and find out what’s out there. [Recommendation: IFI is a fan of AbelCine and Adorama when working on indie film projects.]
  3. Hands down one of the best resources for shooting in NYC is the Mayor’s Office. The Made in NY team handles all film and television projects around the City. You will find everything from free workshops to free or low cost locations that are either state owned, affiliated or offered by private owners. [Recommendation: Follow them for updates at Made in NY.
  4. Respect your locations because spaces to shoot are difficult to acquire. Making sure renters have a good experience with filmmakers encourages them to keep offering spaces to crews after your use. This is especially true in NYC. Bad experiences lead owners to say no. This affects all of us and increases rental fees further limiting access to smaller budget projects.
  5. Take no short cuts on recording sound for your project. You can shoot on the most expensive 4K camera out there. But, if your sound is weak, it will affect your post workflow; causing you to spend more money fixing it in the end.
  6. Need extra hands on your independent film? Reach out to local film programs for skilled and eager talent looking to gain more experience and build their reel. Film students are encouraged to always be on the lookout for opportunities where they can get hands-on work. Check in with department administrators to spread the word about your project.

Image result for made in ny film shoot


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com