Is Film School For Me?

Back to school with IFI

As the sun sets in the sky ever earlier and a chill creeps into the air, it signals the time has come to head back to school. But, with the end of carefree summer days comes the excitement and back-to-business buzz of fall. Sharpen your pencils because International Film Institute of New York (IFI) founder Misael Sanchez is here to take you to school on the benefits of studying film. Whether you’re a teen testing the waters, a passionate filmmaker considering a graduate degree, or an adult looking to learn a new skill, Misael’s got you covered from immersive courses to film school, and how to evaluate the options:

What are the benefits of attending a film school?

Misael Sanchez: First, it is an opportunity to completely immerse yourself into something you are passionate about and be able to devote 100% of yourself to making films. Of course, if you are attending an undergraduate program that requires you to complete other degree requirements you’d still have to balance, that’s still an amazing opportunity. Second, you surround yourself with like-minded individuals working toward the same goal. Yes, it is fun gathering your friends and making them act and work behind the camera for you. But, in film school there is no arm twisting. You fuel each other’s creativity and spend several years developing relationships that will last long after graduation. This is definitely the one aspect of school that I have witnessed be the greatest benefit. And lastly, some might consider this the most important, you get to work with faculty that have been in the field for years and can provide you the support and guidance to find your voice. Equipment and facilities, to me, do not make a film school great. Yes, it is nice to work with good cameras and have lights and sound production resources, but to base your choices on what school to attend based solely on that is not something I would encourage.

Misael WorkshopWhat advice do you have for younger students (i.e., teens, undergraduates)?

MS: My advice to young people considering film as a career is to make sure this is right for you before committing time and money. Filmmaking is not cheap. Tuition alone is enough to send you to the ER. On top of that, you have the costs associated with your projects followed by years of trial and error to make it all come together. Find a way to explore what film has to offer. Consider short term programs to test the waters. It is definitely not all about the red carpet. Filmmaking is a job that takes commitment.

What advice do you have for older students (i.e., adults, graduate candidates)?

MS: There is also something very interesting about adults entering the field. There is a very strong desire to succeed and make it happen fast because you are not a recent college grad and you believe you have more experience to make it happen. My biggest advice for adults is to leave the ego at the door and take in the experience. As adults we pretty much know who we are and what we want to express about ourselves and the world we live in. Make every effort to open your mind to different interpretations of your world and allow yourself to be vulnerable. Allow for mistakes. Most of all, allow yourself to let someone else show you something new. Maybe it won’t be as groundbreaking as you might want but it will be different.

What are some other programs or courses available without the full-time commitment of film school?

MS: Aside from our immersive IFI courses that cover all aspects of the process from script to screen, there are other degree programs that could offer opportunities. Researching and making sure a program fits your needs is key to a positive experience. Online direct student reviews are a great way to read about what others have experienced. Filmschool.org is a great third-party website where students give honest reviews of their experiences. It is where we tell our students to go when we have inquiries about our classes. Also, when communicating with the programs, you should feel like you are being respected as a prospective student. There are never too many questions and the answers should flow. From my perspective, when we discuss our courses with students we see it as an interview process that goes both ways. Are we right for you and what you hope to get from school and are you right for what we provide? We never hesitate to tell a students that maybe our curriculum is not what they need right now. Or, perhaps, you need something longer term.  Best we tackle these questions before you register to make sure our time together is fruitful and a pleasant experience.


The elements of a successful movie have remained constant since the inception of the art form. The International Film Institute of New York (IFI) was founded in 1997 to provide those with a sincere and abiding interest in filmmaking with a high-quality, low-cost education in all aspects of the filmmaking process: screenwriting, directing, producing, cinematography, and editing in a curriculum combining classroom instruction and hands-on technical workshops. http://www.nyfilmschool.com 

Inside An IFI Workshop: Acting For Film

Image

On a recent sunny, spring day in New York City, a pack of fresh-faced young actresses were busy honing their craft. Up a creaky set of stairs and past a white door to a sun-filled second-floor downtown acting studio, rows of young women wearing matching black T-shirts sat in plastic chairs intently watching as, two-by-two, they took turns performing scenes they had memorized overnight. Bright Australian accents filled the whitewashed studio.

IMG_2642

The group of 20 young drama students had traveled all the way from Sydney, where they study at the independent, all-girls MLC School, to participate in an International Film Institute (IFI) workshop on acting for the screen. It was part of a larger two-and-a-half week tour of New York City and Los Angeles that would take them to Broadway plays, Lincoln Center, behind the scenes at Hollywood studios and inside the offices of talent agents and other industry professionals.

IFI instructor Magdalen Zinky gave the girls direction while Kate Montgomery, who teaches camera at IFI, operated a camera trained on each duo’s faces.

“Thank you both for your micro-expressions,” Zinky complimented two girls after they finished a scene from the movie Juno. “There’s a lot going on right here, a lot of facial expressions and raised eyebrows.”

IMG_2640.JPGZinky explained the difference between film and stage acting.

With stage acting, it’s a full-body experience where the emotions have to show through the entire body, whereas with film acting, the main action of it happens in the face. Of course, the body is still important, but the camera is genius at picking up micro-expressions, and that’s where the actor’s focus needs to be.”

Lisa Jinga, head of drama and dance at the MLC School said the dance and drama tour took them three years to plan, and when their tour company asked what they wanted to do, she knew she wanted her girls to have an acting for the camera experience. Naturally, they reached out to IFI, which specializes in teaching every aspect of the film industry, from directing to on-camera work, to aspiring film professionals from all over the globe.

“On  film, every little nuance, glance on your face, it’s much smaller-scale realism,” Jinga said, echoing Zinky. “It’s what happening in your heart and showing on your face. It’s a different interaction with the audience. We want (our students) to get the idea of perfecting the smallest movement.”

The arts, drama and entertainment are very popular programs at the school, where students put on large scale productions, but hands-on, real-life experience of a lesser-practiced skill is invaluable, Jinga said.

“We try to teach them what we call the director’s ‘vision’ for stage and film,” Jinga says. “You’re coming into a partnership with the director, but you’re the interpreter of the vision. It’s valuable experience to work with a director. You’re in the real world and you have to be on time.”

IMG_2590Sabina Tom, 16, relished the challenge of learning a scene overnight and performing for a real-world director the next day.

“I feel like it’s really cool getting to work with people who do this for a living, to work with industry professionals,” Sabina said. “It’s an experience a lot of people don’t have, so I’m grateful.”

It was worthwhile experience for the visiting teachers at the workshop as well, said Kate Caron, the Head of Grade 7 at MLC.

IMG_2645“What’s really valuable for us as teachers is watching the way the directors are working with the girls,” she said. “All the things we say to them over and over, ‘You have to be off-book,’ asking them to improvise, it’s not just us being persnickety. It’s great to see little things being reinforced in a professional environment.”

New York City, itself, is a wonderful acting laboratory, Jinga added. Touring around the city over the past few days, she had pointed out film locations from Gossip Girl territory on the Upper East Side to the famous streets of Little Italy where many Godfather scenes took place.

“I thought it would be great to do some film work here in New York where so many iconic movies have been set,” Jinga said. “To think about Midnight Cowboy, one of the first films to shoot on the streets of New York, not on the back lot of a studio, New York to me is the home of where those films took place. “I’m walkin’ heeyah!” she hollered, doing her best Ratso Rizzo impression.

“This for them is a completely new and different experience and where else would you want to do it than New York? It’s an authentic experience,” said Caron. “You come here and there’s a sense that, ‘Wow, these are real professionals, this is really happening,’ and they rise to the challenge.”

IMG_2606

Mac McCown, a 16-year-old drama student at MLC said she appreciated learning from two women on the other side of the camera lens during the day’s workshop. “The numbers of women in the film industry are so disappointing. It’s so important especially at this young age to see women working in a male dominated profession,” she said.

“We can relate to them and think, ‘We can do that,’” added her classmate, Emma Rutherford, also 16.

Zinky gave the girls a glowing review.

“They did marvelously!” she said. “I was impressed with the overall quality of the students’ commitment and their level of professionalism both on screen and off.”

Jinga pronounced the day’s workshop a success, as well. “It’s been absolutely fantastic,” she said. “It’s opening (our students’) eyes and it’s so different than what we’ve done in previous workshops. They got a very personal, intense experience.”

——

In addition to our summer courses, IFI offers short term seminars and special programs in New York City. Wonder what goes into making a film? Considering going to Film School?  Is filmmaking for you? Our One-Week programs are designed as a comprehensive overview of the process of making films from script through Screening. Along with our
informative seminars, we also have the opportunity to create special workshops and sessions for interested students and visiting groups. All of our courses are presented by film professionals in their respective fields. http://www.nyfilmschool.com 

When you have dreams of becoming the next Wes Anderson

A first-person account of the International Film Institute of New York’s Five-Week Summer Film Intensive

IMG_8289.jpg

We can spend a lot of time daydreaming and talking about future plans, but taking action is what will change our lives. If you have ever wondered what it would be like to press pause on life and pursue your interest in film, we welcome you to the International Film Institute of New York. While directors have taken various paths to success (Ava DuVernay, Mira Nair, Wes Anderson to name a few), they have all gone on record about how important it is to learn and absorb as much as possible to get started in filmmaking. IFI offers intensive professional training in a classroom setting to introduce students to the world of moviemaking. Our short term five-week program revolves around STORYTELLING, which is the ability to properly translate the written page onto the screen. Every student will graduate with a final film and the foundational skills necessary to continue working towards a life in film. Instead of us telling you about the experience at IFI, we decided to have an alumna share her thoughts.

Meet Zena from Cairo, Egypt who was a 2016 Summer Filmmaking Intensive student. Zena joined us at Sarah Lawrence College in June for five weeks of screenwriting, directing, lighting, camera tech, casting, editing and production courses.

Why did you choose IFI?  I’m still in high school in Egypt, but I sought out a true filmmaking experience to explore the parts that I found most interesting. I wanted to take my first film course with IFI to learn everything about filmmaking – how it works from writing a screenplay to production and screenings.

What did you work on at IFI?  I wrote my first-ever screenplay, and it was such a cool experience. It is about a guy who is Schizophrenic and makes clay figures. He believes they are real people, but they’re not.

How was your experience making your first film?  It was exciting. I was excited and anxious about the screening of my first film. We worked on it for a long time, so it was fun to share it with other people and see/hear their reactions.

What was the most difficult part of filmmaking for you?  I kept looking over my footage. I’m a perfectionist, and I always want to do better. But, the thing is that most people don’t see the mistakes that you do in your own work. So, the most difficult part of filmmaking for me was seeing my mistakes, knowing what I would improve next time, and accepting it. In the end, I put together the footage that would be the best for my first film.

To see Zena’s and other films from the 2016 Summer Filmmaking Intensive click here.

Our 2017 Summer Filmmaking Intensive (June 25 – July 28) is already filling up. To secure your spot or ask questions, visit www.nyfilmschool.com.